herons rest to dittisham via kingswear and dartmouth

dart valley trail

saturday, 4th may 2019

thursday, 9th may 2019

When I attempted this walk on Saturday I kept running out of Dart Valley Trail signs and so kept getting lost and ended up walking miles out of my way. I attempted the walk again on Thursday and made my way all around without getting lost this time. This account is an amalgamation of both walks but based on not going wrong.

The weather forecast looks pretty good today with sunshine all day long but I don’t like the look of those northerly winds which should make for a pretty chilly day.

Greenway Quay high tide 07:10

Greenway Quay low tide 12:58

weather forecast 2.jpg
tide times 2.jpg

I start the day at our holiday cottage, Herons Rest, set high above the River Dart and Dartmouth. I leave the cottage and head along the road before heading along a track beside some cottages.

the view from herons rest

I walk alongside a field of wheat before climbing a stile which takes me into Long Wood which is largely owned by the National Trust. The wildflowers in the hedgerows are looking at their finest.

Near to the start of Long Wood I come across a patch of dreaded Japanese knotweed. It’s only a small patch but I wonder how long it will take to spread.

long wood

japanese knotweed

I amble down through the wood enjoying the masses of bluebells and other wildflowers and I have fleeting views of the River Dart and its creeks.

view over the river dart

I leave the wood and briefly join the road down to Noss. Phillip and Son Shipyard used to be located here until 1999 and is now the home to Noss Marina. Swallows are flying all around the marina.

noss marina

The shipyard was attacked by German bombers on the 18th of September 1942, killing 20 men and women who were building military vessels to assist in the war effort. There should be a memorial stone here in honour of the people who lost their lives during the bombing but I failed to find it.

THOSE WHO LOST THEIR LIVES ON 18 SEPTEMBER 1942

Frederick Clarence Adams, aged 22
John Richard Ash, aged 21
David Bott, aged 29
Jack George Charles Bustin, aged 52
Rosie Annie Crang, aged 20
Thomas Farr, aged 58
Richard Franklin, aged 26
Lionel Edgar Holden, aged 44
Walter Lewis, aged 40
George Herbert Frank Little, aged 17
Henry James Luckhurst, aged 70
John Martin, aged 48
Ernest Poole, aged 51
Sydney James Alfred Pope, aged 17
Hubert Ernest William Putt, aged 37
Ewart Edgar Trant, aged 27
Nella Eileen Trebilcock, aged 28
Samuel James Veale, aged 21
Frederick Thomas Skinner Vickery, aged 28
Hazel Joan Weaver, aged 20

I retrace my steps and cross a road and pass Coombe Cottage before continuing along the path towards Kingswear. I come across a patch of early purple orchids.

A sign warns me about killer pine cones! I joke but the cones are monsters and could do some serious damage if one lands on your head.

killer pine cones

killer pine cones

I now have magnificent views over Dartmouth.

view over dartmouth

view over dartmouth

I drop down to the road that takes me to Dartmouth Higher Ferry.

dartmouth higher ferry

I join the railway track of the Paington to Kingswear Railway and follow the railway track in to Kingswear. As I reach Kingswear I have a lovely view of the steam train pulling into the station.

I follow the footpath over a footbridge above the railway line and into Kingswear where I pass the Steam Packet Inn, the Ship Inn and the railway station.

steam packet inn

ship inn

railway station

Here I take the Dartmouth Lower Ferry over to Dartmouth. It costs me the princely sum of £1.50.

dartmouth lower ferry

ferry ticket

The crossing offers lovely views of Dartmouth, Kingswear, Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth Castle and the open sea.

I alight the ferry below Bayards Cove Fort, a Tudor fort built between 1522 and 1536.

I can’t find any Dart Valley Trail signs so I’m going to have to make up the route through Dartmouth. I walk along the Embankment passing many canons and also the, now closed, Cottage Hospital and Dart Marina and Dart Marina Hotel and Spa.

canon

I walk through Royal Avenue Gardens, enjoying all of the varied flowerbeds.

I pass Dartmouth Visitor Centre and head behind the health centre where I find a set of stone steps, Cox’s Steps, heading upwards. This takes me to Clarence Hill which climbs steeply up to Tounstal Hill and then to Church Road where I pass St Clement’s Church, clad in scaffolding and plastic.

st clement’s church

I can see where I went wrong on Saturday now. There’s a Dart Valley Trail sign on a lamppost on this side of the road but I’d already crossed the road so I completely missed it and there isn’t a corresponding sign on the other side of the road.

I cross the busy A379 near to the entrance to Britannia Royal Naval College and walk down Old Mill Lane behind the college.

britannia royal naval college

I reach the end of the road and come across more signs pointing across Tounsal Crescent. I cross the road and find some steps next to Archway Cottage which takes me down to the next part of Old Mill Lane. I amble along this lane for quite some time until it takes me to Old Mill Creek.

old mill creek

At Old Mill Creek I cross over a bridge and turn right and follow a road which becomes unmetaled Lapthorne Lane where I pass Distin’s Boatyard and Creekside Boatyard, which looks like it might be up for sale.

old mill creek

I come across a signpost, next to a Raleigh Estate information board, which shows me that the Dart Valley Trail takes two different routes. On Saturday I took the shorter route but Thursday I take the longer route to my right.

raleigh estate information board

choices

I amble through a woodland area which turns into a pine forest, passing, what my notes tell me is a lake on my right, but I’m sure it must be just part of the creek.

pine forest

not a lake

The woodland alternates between broadleaf and pine and the edges of the path are covered in mint for some reason. There are wildflowers everywhere, including some foxgloves not quite in flower yet and some wild strawberries.

I leave the forest and cross a steeply sloping field where I have lovely views back over the River Dart.

view over the river dart

I climb up a path next to fields. I hear the steam train chugging back to Paignton and I have lovely views over to Noss Marina on the other side of the river.

view over to noss marina

It’s a long climb upwards before I reach Green Lane, although it’s not marked on my Ordnance Survey map, which is covered in stinky wild garlic.

green lane

I turn right into fields and cross a field with no discernible path through it but the Dart Valley Trail sign is pointing right across the field. I follow a deeply rutted track which is full of yesterday’s rain until I join the road at Fire Beacon Hill. It must be a stinky old path after some proper rain.

I briefly follow the road before climbing over a stile and along a track and I’m now on the outskirts of Dittisham, where I climb down Rectory Lane. I detour left to visit the church as the photo I took of the church on Sunday was overblown.

I retrace my steps and amble steeply down through Dittisham.

At the bottom of the road I reach the gaudy, pink Ferry Boat Inn and Anchorstone Cafe on the banks of the River Dart.

ferry boat inn

anchorstone cafe

Here I catch the Greenway and Dittisham ferry which takes me over the river to Greenway. The ferry fare is £2.

river dart at dittisham

greenway and dittisham ferry

I head up the road briefly and then head through a side entrance to the Greenway Estate, once the holiday home of Agatha Christie.

One day we saw that a house was up for sale that I had known when I was young... So we went over to Greenway, and very beautiful the house and grounds were. A white Georgian house of about 1780 or 90, with woods sweeping down to the Dart below, and a lot of fine shrubs and trees - the ideal house, a dream house.
— Agatha Christie

I spend a bit of time enjoying the edge of the gardens of Greenway Estate before heading for home.

I pass through a field on the outskirts of the estate before I enter a field where I have magnificent views high over the River Dart towards Dartmouth.

I follow a road past the Maypool Youth Hostel and from here it is a short walk back to Herons Rest.

FLORA AND FAUNA

Flora and fauna encountered on the walk today includes :-

  • skylarks

  • buzzards

  • honesty

  • red campion

  • bluebells

  • greater stitchwort

  • japanese knotweed

  • herb robert

  • celandines

  • wrens

  • whitethroats

  • chiffchaffs

  • navalwort

  • bugle

  • garlic mustard

  • gorse

  • lords and ladies

  • common dog-violet

  • oaks

  • holly

  • pheasants

  • swallows

  • wild garlic

  • early purple orchids

  • common bird’s-foot trefoil

  • orange tip butterflies

  • green alkanet

  • mint

  • foxgloves not quite in flower

  • buddleia

  • wild strawberries

podcast logo small.png

PODCAST

The podcast of today's walk is now available. You can subscribe via the iTunes store or listen using the player below.

10 out of 10.png

MARKS OUT OF TEN?

According to my phone I've walked 12.6 miles today which amounts to 25494 steps (on Saturday I managed to walk 14.2 miles with 29679 steps). It has been magnificent walking today in what turned out to be not too bad weather. The walk had ferries and trains and helicopters. Ten out of ten!

The total ascent today has been 997 feet or 303 metres.

MAP

noss marina

early purple orchid

dartmouth

steam train

ferry boat inn

dartmouth to torcross

south west coast path

wednesday, 14th september 2016

After yesterday's thundery weather it looks like today will be a lovely day for walking. Perfect autumnal weather.

Dartmouth low tide 10:36

Dartmouth high tide 17:11

I start the day just above the bank of the River Dart over the river from Dartmouth and head down the road to catch the Higher Ferry (I was robbed of 60p for the crossing!) over to Dartmouth. Dartmouth is shrouded in mist as I cross over the river.

dartmouth from the ferry

misty dartmouth

I depart from the ferry and pass the Floating Bridge Inn and amble along the waterfront into Dartmouth..

I continue ambling through Dartmouth before walking along the cobbled waterfront, passing Bayards Cove Inn and then through Bayards Cove Fort, a small Tudor artillery fort guarding Dartmouth's inner harbour. I climb steps to leave the waterfront and head through Warfleet Creek and towards St Petrox Church.

From here I head next door to Dartmouth Castle which, for over 600 years, has guarded the narrow entrance to the Dart estuary.

I pass above Castle Cove where dogs are being exercised. It looks rather inviting down on the sandy and shingly beach but my path heads upwards.

castle cove

I climb steeply and then the path zig zags out towards Blackstone Point, Coombe Point and then Warren Point. I have some final lovely views back to Dartmouth.

view back to dartmouth

I also now have fantastic views over to my destination for the day, Slapton Sands and Torcross.

destination slapton sands

I pass secluded coves on the way, there are numerous dogwalkers and the skies are full of housemartins, before I head inland to reach a minor road at Little Dartmouth.

I come across a small copper butterfly feeding on an oxeye daisy. Not my greatest ever photograph I've taken but it's only the third small copper I've seen this year. It hasn't been a great year for butterflies.

small copper butterfly

The hydrangeas in the lanes around here are looking lovely.

I come across walkers enjoying the early morning sun including one person in a David Bowie t-shirt. I come across clumps of ivy heaving with bees, wasps, flies and red admiral butterflies.

This road leads to the A379 which takes me in to Stoke Fleming. I barely stay on the A379 before heading up Ravensbourne Lane and then Venn Lane where I come across what must practically be the whole village playing boules. How have I magically managed to cross the English Channel and ended up in France?

I walk down lanes through the village, surrounded by rooks, and come out next to the Green Dragon and St Peter's Church.

the green dragon

I can't find any coast path signs so wrongly follow the A379 out of Stoke Fleming. I know I've gone wrong because further on down the road I come across a coast path sign pointing back to Stoke Fleming above the road. 

I continue along the road where I have lovely views over Blackpool Sands before the path ducks down between bushes and past the toilet block and out on to the beach.

view over blackpool sands

I have a potter around the sandy and shingly beach and there are quite a few people on the beach enjoying the beautiful weather. I wander back to the Venus Beach Cafe where I go in search of an ice lolly as I'm starting to get quite hot. They must be running supplies down for the winter as they don't have much choice so I settle for a strawberry mini milk. It doesn't last long!

blackpool sands

I leave Blackpool Sands via a lovely woodland path but when I leave the woods I find that conditions are sudden overcast. Huh?! I cross a steep grassy valley and have some lovely views one last time back over Blackpool Sands.

view back over Blackpool Sands

A rather circuitous route follows fields and paths to reach Strete where I pass the King's Arms (@KingsArmsStrete). As I recall, the pub was closed and to let the last time I came this way, but it is now renovated, run by locals and looking lovely.

the king's arms

I follow the A379 out of Strete but it's not long before I come across a new section of the South West Coast Path, only opened in July 2015, which takes me away from the busy main road. It's rather nice on this new section and I come across a pair of jays straight away.

The path takes me down towards Strete Gate picnic site and I pass a bench with magnificent views over Slapton Sands. The bench is dedicated to the memory of Philip and Mary Carter. Thank you Philip and Mary.

view over slapton sands

In memory of Philip and Mary Carter. Tireless campaigners for South West Coast Path and founders of the South West Coast Path Association.

I continue descending to Strete Gate and come across a small tortoiseshell butterfly feeding on buddleia.

small tortoiseshell

Even though it is getting quite late in the year, the wild flowers around here are looking lovely.

I pass a sign pointing up the bridleway where I used to come down onto Slapton Sands.

old route

I drop down onto Slapton Sands and trudge along the sandy and shingly beach. It has turned back into a beautiful day. I'm usually defeated by the shingle and blustery winds and head for a path by the main road but conditions are perfect today so I head all the way along the beach to Torcross. Actually, the beach isn't as shingly as I remember it.

slapton sands

Today's walking is over and I'm rather hot so I head to the Start Bay Inn (@StartBayInn) where I enjoy a yummy pint of Otter Brewery's Otter Ale. What a perfect end to a perfect day.

otter ale

We drive back to Dartmouth for some chips by the river with a beautiful view over to Kingswear.

view over to kingswear

beach collection

FLORA AND FAUNA

Flora and fauna encountered on the walk today includes :-

  • hydrangeas
  • pigeons
  • housemartins
  • great tits
  • buzzards
  • small copper butterfly
  • ox eye daisies
  • fuchsias
  • common toadflax
  • lords and ladies
  • robins
  • ivy
  • wasps
  • bees
  • red admirals
  • rooks
  • larches
  • holly
  • gunnera
  • red valerian
  • white valerian
  • sweet chestnuts
  • buddleia
  • jays
  • red campion
  • a small tortoiseshell butterfly
  • great mullein
  • musk mallows (I think)
  • perforate st john's-wort
  • common centaury

PODCAST

The podcast of today's walk is now available. You can subscribe via the iTunes store or listen using the player below.

MARKS OUT OF TEN?

According to my phone I've walked 11.4 miles today which amounts to 25011 steps. The weather has been glorious and the walking as good as it gets. I'm in a generous mood. Ten out of ten!

My total ascent today has been 488 metres or 1601 feet.

MAP

dartmouth

red admiral

blackpool sands

slapton sands

dartmouth to marldon via brixham and paignton

SOUTH WEST COAST PATH

saturday, 10TH september 2016

It looks like it will be a filthy start to the day but if I'm patient the weather should improve throughout the day and I should have some decent walking conditions later on.

Paignton high tide 12:15

Paignton low tide 18:33

We start the first day of Autumn coast path walking by taking the car over the River Dart on the Higher Ferry and then drive into Dartmouth and park up. It's a filthy start to the day and chucking it down so I hang around in the car for a bit hoping the rain will ease off. It doesn't so I don my waterproofs and head off.

I head through the lower part of Dartmouth, not particularly enjoying the manky weather.

manky dartmouth

I cross back over the River Dart to Kingswear using the lower ferry which costs me £1.50. On reaching Kingswear I pass under an arch next to the post office and then climb up Alma Steps.

I take one final look back over to Dartmouth and then set off for Brixham.

view over dartmouth from kingswear

I follow a minor road out of the village and then follow a private road towards Kingswear Court. I enter Warren Woods and zig zag down a slope, cross over a stream and then zig zag up the other side of the valley.

I now have lovely views back over to Dartmouth Castle on the other side of the river mouth. At least they would be lovely if it wasn't still raining heavily!

I reach Brownstone Battery at Inner Froward Point, built in 1940 to protect the Dart estuary and Slapton and Blackpool Sands from enemy invasion. The battery consists of two gun positions and each would have been armed with six inch guns. The gun emplacements remain to this day as do the two magazines that served the guns. Below the gun emplacements are two searchlight positions which would have scanned the sea for enemy ships.

brownstone battery

The path zig zags up and down the cliffs towards Outer Froward Point where, out to sea, can be seen Shooter Rock, Shag Stone and Mew Stone. I continue meandering along the coast path passing Old Mill Bay, Kelly's Cove and Pudcombe Cove. On the way I come across some friendly ponies who just stand around blocking the coast path.

friendly ponies

Eventually a fellow walker turns up and barges through the ponies. I follow in his footsteps. 

I come across the rear entrance of Coleton Fishacre which used to be infested with rhododendrons (presumably ponticum) but these appear to have been grubbed up now leaving hydrangeas all around.

The weather is finally brightening up and I can see some bits of blue sky. I come across a sign telling me that Man Sands is two and a quarter miles away.

blue sky! man sands two and a quarter miles away

I come across an apple tree laden with apples and presumably grown from a discarded core before rounding Scabbacombe Head where the skies are now decidedly blue. I pass another pony munching on the bracken.

blue skies over scabbacombe and man sands

A steep, slippery and muddy descent leads me down to Scabbacombe Sands. The edge of the stream near the top of the beach smells of mint. The beach is deserted.

scabbacombe sands

I head along the cliffs high above Long Sands and round Crabrock Point, passing Crabrock Point Coastguard Cottage, to reach Man Sands where I enjoy the pebbly and sandy beach.  

man sands

It is a steep climb up onto Southdown Cliff where I pass cows making an awful racket.

cow

I reach Sharkham Point and then  head around St Mary's Bay, passing below the holiday village. I head down some scabby steps where the cliffs are infested with japanese knotweed and head out onto St Mary's Bay Beach. There are a few dog walkers on the beach.

st mary's bay beach

japanese knotweed infestation

It is now a short walk to Berry Head, a National Nature Reserve, where I amble along the meandering paths.

I join a road which passes the Berry Head Hotel and walk through Shoalstone Car Park. It is now a pleasant waterfront walk leading me into Brixham where I pass above the art deco Shoalstone Sea Water Pool. A harbourside walk from the breakwater takes me to the centre of the town where a statue of William Prince of Orange, who landed here on the 5th of November 1688,  stands at the head of the harbour.

The Liberties of England and The Protestant Religion I Will Maintain

Brixham is heaving with people on this now pleasant Saturday afternoon, probably not helped by the fact that Fishstock Brixham seafood and music festival is taking place today.

brixham

I go in search of an ice lolly to cool me down and then pass the full sized replica of the Golden Hind in which Sir Francis Drake circumnavigated the globe and then pass Brixham Fish Market, where Fishstock is in full swing,  before heading out of Brixham at Oxen Cove next to what was once AstraZeneca's Brixham Environmental Laboratory but which was donated to Plymouth University in 2013

oxen cove

I climb up concrete steps to reach Battery Gardens and pass the Brixham Battery Heritage Centre. I round Fishcombe Cove and a steep climb out of the cove awaits.

fishcombe cove

I walk around the beach at Churston Cove and a woodland path takes me past Churston Golf Club.

churston cove

I walk across the shingly beach at Elberry Cove, which is surprisingly busy,  before rounding Churston Point to reach the delightful Broadsands, you guessed it, a broad sandy beach flanked by colourful beach huts.

elberry cove

I enjoy the sandy beach here before walking past the colourful beach huts and exit at the far end of the beach, passing beneath the railway viaduct.

colourful beach huts at broadsands

I then follow the railway line towards Goodrington Sands and the Paignton to Kingswear steam train passes me, heading in the opposite direction. I head along the beach at Goodrington Sands, passing the colourful beach huts and head past the Inn on the Quay. The emptying pints on the tables look very inviting.

I follow paths over Roundham Head and walk through Roundham Gardens where I have lovely views back over Goodrington Sands.

view back over goodrington sands

 Paignton is now laid out in front of me.

I pass Paignton's tiny harbour and walk along the esplanade to reach the pier where I head inland in search of a much needed ice lolly. It has been a hot end to the day.

I head along the busy Paignton streets full of amusement arcades and it's now time to finish my walk by heading inland along the busy main road to reach the village of Marldon, on the outskirts of Paignton, where our holiday cottage for the week resides.

Unbelieveably, although I've been climbing up and down cliffs all day long, the long ascent out of Paignton to Marldon proves to be the steepest ascent of the day!

FLORA AND FAUNA

Flora and fauna encountered on the walk today includes :-

  • hydrangeas
  • agapanthus
  • fig trees
  • echiums
  • blackberries
  • gorse
  • bracken
  • buzzards
  • honeysuckle
  • oxeye daisies
  • black sheep
  • mint
  • cows
  • red campion
  • red admiral butterflies
  • speckled wood butterflies
  • a comma butterfly
  • stonechats

PODCAST

The podcast of today's walk is now available. You can subscribe via the iTunes store or listen using the player below.

MARKS OUT OF TEN?

According to my phone I've walked 22.6 miles today which amounts to 50823 steps. Ouch! It has been a lovely day's walking on the South West Coast Path, despite a manky start to the day. Nine out of ten!

My total ascent today has been 1161 metres or 3809 feet.

MAP

brixham

goodrington sands

heron's rest to torcross

south west coast path

10th may 2014

We're staying this week in a cottage called Heron's Rest, thanks to Classic Cottages. The cottage is set in a peaceful location, high above the Dart valley overlooking Dartmouth.

The weather forecast for today has been dreadful (but getting progressively better) all week and after heavy overnight rain it looks like I've got a thoroughly nice spring day to look forward to. Could be a bit blustery though.

Dartmouth high tide 15:49

Dartmouth low tide 08:59

tide times.jpg

After packing my bag, I leave Heron's Rest for the walk through Long Wood down to the ferry crossing over the River Dart to Dartmouth. It's a lovely Spring day so I take advantage and photograph some of the spring flowers.

long wood

Just before leaving Long Wood I come across a sign warning of basking adders. Unfortunately the day is still young and so hasn't warmed up yet so I don't come across any.

After the delightful walk through Long Wood I reach the bank of the River Dart and catch the Higher Ferry (I was robbed of 50p for the crossing!) over to Dartmouth.

I amble through Dartmouth passing the Floating Bridge Inn and come across a Morgan Roadstar Brooklands Edition car parked on the waterfront.

morgan roadstar brooklands edition

warfleet creek

I continue ambling through Dartmouth passing the Ship in the Dock Inn, the Windjammer Inn and the George and Dragon before walking along the cobbled waterfront, passing Bayards Cove Inn and then through Bayards Cove Fort, a small Tudor artillery fort guarding Dartmouth's inner harbour. I climb steps to leave the waterfront and head through Warfleet Creek and towards St Petrox Church.

st petrox church

From here I head next door to Dartmouth Castle which, for over 600 years, has guarded the narrow entrance to the Dart estuary.

The path zig zags out towards Blackstone Point, Coombe Point and then Warren Point, passing secluded coves on the way before heading inland to reach a minor road. This road leads to the A379 which takes me in to Stoke Fleming where I pass the Green Dragon and St Peter's Church.

st peter's church

green dragon

I follow the A379 (think I've gone the wrong way!) out of Stoke Fleming and on to Blackpool Sands where I have a potter around the shingly beach. The Venus Beach Cafe can be found here.

blackpool sands

king's arms

I leave Blackpool Sands via a lovely woodland path and cross a steep grassy valley and then a rather circuitous route (needless to say I got lost!) to reach Strete where I pass the King's Arms (it seems to be closed and is to let) and see St Michael's Church in the distance.

woodland flowers

I follow the A379 out of Strete before a path takes me down to the Strete Gate picnic site from where I drop down onto Slapton Sands. I trudge along the beach which starts off sandy but soon becomes more shingly.

slapton sands

The wind has been blustery all day but seems to turn into a gale here and I can barely stay on my feet so I head back to the main road to try and find some relief, cross it, and drop down to a path that follows the road in front of Slapton Ley. There isn't any relief!

torcross

From here it should be an easy walk to the car park at Torcross, the destination for today's walk. Unfortunately, today it isn't an easy walk so I stumble around in the wind until I reach the car park where I shelter in a hide overlooking Slapton Ley for a bit.

slapton ley

I leave the shelter of the hide, head past the Sherman tank at the entrance of the car park and on to the Start Bay Inn (@StartBayInn) where I enjoy a yummy pint of Otter Brewery's Otter Ale.

otter ale

I leave the shelter of the hide, head past the Sherman tank at the entrance of the car park and on to the Start Bay Inn (@StartBayInn) where I enjoy a yummy pint of Otter Brewery's Otter Ale.

FLORA AND FAUNA

Flora and fauna encountered on the walk today includes :-

  • owls
  • magpies
  • no adders
  • chaffinches
  • robins
  • wrens
  • thrushes
  • empty snail shells
  • skylarks
  • bluebells
  • wild garlic
  • swallows
  • red campion

PODCAST

The podcast of today's walk is now available.  You can subscribe via the iTunes store or listen using the player below.



MARKS OUT OF TEN?

According to my phone I've walked 16 miles today (much further than I was expecting) which amounts to 32396 steps. Despite the wind for most of the day it has been a great day's spring walking with plenty of interest to see throughout the day. 9 out of 10.


View heron's rest to torcross in a larger map